Waking up to a Liberal minority government

Message on behalf of business manager Mike Gallagher: For many of our members, waking up to a Liberal minority government may have come as a surprise. The federal campaign was particularly acrimonious between the two main political parties Andrew Scheer’s Progressive Conservatives and Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government. The result of the election was difficult for […]

Message on behalf of business manager Mike Gallagher:

For many of our members, waking up to a Liberal minority government may have come as a surprise. The federal campaign was particularly acrimonious between the two main political parties Andrew Scheer’s Progressive Conservatives and Justin Trudeau’s Liberal government.

The result of the election was difficult for anyone to predict, although the polls from the beginning to the end of the 40-day campaign more or less ended the way they started – with a virtual tie between the two main parties.

Some surprises did come about, including the defeat of Maxine Bernier and the dismal showing of the People’s Party of Canada. From my perspective, that was a good thing because of its anti-immigration, non-inclusive populous message. Populism is what brought Donald Trump to power south of the border. Whatever your opinions are, it’s the government that’s non-efficient and seems to be up to its neck in scandals from one day to the next. It’s not a pretty picture and all of us should be grateful to be in a parliamentary, stable democracy.

It also had to be a disappointing night for the Green Party, even though they tripled their seat count from the last election – from one MP to three. Having said that, it remains a party that many people share the environmental message that is their mainstay. The question is, can they run capably into areas of vital importance, which is the economic wellbeing of the country?

Canadian’s obviously don’t think so. Not at this point, at least.

Another interesting result from the election was the Bloc Québécois. They were able to block any Conservative momentum in Québec, stole Liberal seats, and nearly wiped out the NDP in the province. It showed how divided we are with the revival of the Bloc. The Bloc took support from the other parties, particularly the Liberals and Conservatives in Quebec, to rise in support of sovereignty to levels not seen since the days of Jean Chrétien as prime minister.

It was unsettling to hear such nationalist language in the victory speech delivered. Most Canadians, and I would include Quebec in that, do not wish to be dragged down that path.

For Local 793 specifically, it was disappointing to hear the anti-pipeline messages. Bloc leader Yves-François Blanchet said the party would vigorously oppose any attempt to pass a pipeline through Quebec.

On the other side, we see the resurgence of western alienation. The Conservatives took back the four seats in Alberta they lost to the Liberals in 2015 and swept all of Saskatchewan. Two Liberal seats in the suburbs around Winnipeg also fell to the Conservatives. In the province of British Columbia, the Conservatives also made minor gains while the Liberals stumbled.

Calgary major Naheed Nenshi was on the CBC panel Monday evening and he elegantly pointed out that it doesn’t signify Albertans are permanently on the right of the political spectrum. Rather, they are frustrated from the economic challenges of the oil and gas industry.

Prime minister Trudeau just can’t ignore the situation in Quebec or in Western Canada, which he acknowledged in his acceptance speech. He heard the message and pledged to work towards uniting the country. That will be his biggest challenge.

I would like to acknowledge that our members had strong opinions and have been frustrated with the Trudeau government. Various political scandals, ethics violations and multiple incidents of blackface to the onerous Bill C-69, dubbed the “no more pipelines bill.” I share some of these frustrations, as do other business managers across Canada. Unfortunately, the Conservatives have alienated any chance of support from labour by continuing to pander to their anti-union base.

In our view, there’s no point going from the frying pan into the fire. We will continue to work with the Liberal government with what will be to the benefit to the union’s members and families. For example, investing in infrastructure. The Conservative Party’s platform was not good for jobs, which was to reduce infrastructure spending by $18 billion over the next five years.

The area of a national pharmacare program, which both the Liberals and NDP supported, needs to be universal. While active members and select retirees who have a retiree plan pay for and have a good prescription drug plan, they remain vulnerable when out of work for any length of time. A universal pharmacare program would make sure nobody amongst our members falls through the cracks and they will always be able to get the prescriptions needed.

It would also save our benefit plan a considerable amount of money, which would help to keep our plan affordable. We will support, as we have been, for a universal pharmacare plan.

In areas of training, the Liberal government has been supporting operating engineers training institutes across the country. We will be seeking an extension of that support with this minority government. We will press for all federal projects across Canada to be union built by our members as opposed to non-union or CLAC. Wherever there is public funding provided, those jobs should be union since it is our members who best support the economy of this country by investing in pension and benefits plans.

The challenge is not over for prime minister Trudeau. He must cobble together a coalition or an accord with NDP leader Jagmeet Singh and their 24 seats. Trudeau needs 170 votes to pass legislation.

His first challenge will be his speech from the throne. The next challenge will be the budget, which if defeated, would lead to another national election.

Minority governments by their nature are not as stable as majority governments. But they are appealing because the governing party must cooperate in order to get their agenda into legislation. Most Canadians, myself included, would not like to see another costly election within the first two years of the new mandate.

In conclusion, you can’t please everybody, but we have a new government that we can work with on a number of fronts. We will not be facing right-to-work type legislation inspired by the Conservative friends and Republican friends to the south. We can do things our way – the union way. The threat of anti-union governments, either provincially or federally, is never too far away so we will have to remain vigilant.

2020 Ray Goodfellow Scholarship Fund

Deadline for applications for The Ray Goodfellow Scholarship Fund is March 27, 2020. The award is sponsored by the Crane Rental Association of Ontario and International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 793. The award is named after the late Ray Goodfellow, who owned Whiskey Jack Cranes Inc. Ray was president of the Crane Rental Association of […]

Deadline for applications for The Ray Goodfellow Scholarship Fund is March 27, 2020.

The award is sponsored by the Crane Rental Association of Ontario and International Union of Operating Engineers, Local 793.

The award is named after the late Ray Goodfellow, who owned Whiskey Jack Cranes Inc. Ray was president of the Crane Rental Association of Ontario, a 24-year member of Local 793, and a management trustee on the union’s training and life and health benefits trust funds.

To be eligible for this scholarship, the applicant must be the son, daughter or grandchild of one of the following:

  • A Crane Rental Association of Ontario (CRAO) company owner; or
  • An Employee of a CRAO company; or
  • An IUOE Local 793 member in good standing who is employed by a company that is an active member of the CRAO that works in the crane rental or concrete pump sectors.

Each year, a committee appointed by the Crane Rental Association of Ontario board of directors determines the amount and number of scholarships to be awarded. In 2019, three awards of $5,000 each were awarded.

The scholarship recipient must be entering the first or subsequent year of a full-time course of study (at least two years in length) leading to a diploma, certificate or degree from any recognized public Canadian college or university.

Eligible persons are able to apply more than once. However, once they have received a bursary they are no longer eligible to receive another award.

Applications must be supported by:

  • Transcripts of high school/ post-secondary achievement, and
  • Accompanied by a detailed letter of recommendation from an individual with personal academic knowledge of the candidate, outlining reasons why the bursary should be awarded.

Applicants must also submit a one thousand (1,000) word essay on the subject of either A or B:

A: The reason(s) why the scholarship will be of assistance.
B: The impact of being a dependent or grandchild of an active member of the Crane Rental Association of Ontario working in the crane rental and concrete pump sectors.

Click here to download an application.

100th Anniversary Dinner Dance

IUOE Local 793 celebrates its 100th anniversary with dinner, dancing and reflecting on a century of Brother and Sisterhood.

IUOE Local 793 celebrates its 100th anniversary with dinner, dancing and reflecting on a century of Brother and Sisterhood.

Local 793 hosts Ministry of Labour guests

Local 793 business manager Mike Gallagher welcomed Ontario government officials to the Union’s head office and training campus in Oakville on Monday, Sept. 23. Ontario’s minister of labour Monte McNaughton, along with parliamentary assistant to the minister of infrastructure, Stephen Crawford, were the welcome guests. Joining business manager Gallagher was Local 793 president Joe Redshaw, […]

Local 793 business manager Mike Gallagher welcomed Ontario government officials to the Union’s head office and training campus in Oakville on Monday, Sept. 23.

Ontario’s minister of labour Monte McNaughton, along with parliamentary assistant to the minister of infrastructure, Stephen Crawford, were the welcome guests.

Joining business manager Gallagher was Local 793 president Joe Redshaw, vice-president and acting executive director of training Joe Dowdall and director of training and apprenticeship Brain Alexander.

The meeting was an opportunity to let the Progressive Conservative Party members know Local 793 is prepared to provide advice when it comes to issues of importance, like health and safety in training.

Amongst the subjects discussed was mandatory training and compulsory certification.

“Compulsory certification and mandatory training of workers entering the industry drastically lowers accidents and fatality numbers,” business manager Gallagher stated.

He talked about an independent study by the Construction Safety Association of Ontario, conducted by retired executive director Don Dickie, which found that for the trade of mobile and tower crane operators, fatalities were reduced by over 80 per cent.

Business manager Gallagher did not shy away from letting the guests know he’s not a supporter of the Conservative government.
He did, however, state that since they have formed the government, Local 793 would provide advice on training and health and safety, should they choose to listen.

“I’m not a Conservative but if you’re looking for unbiased advice, we’ll share what we know from our experience,” he said. “We will work with you to help put together a good policy or legislation meant to save lives.”

A short video highlighting the importance of training and compulsory certification was shown in the Union’s newly renovated OE Banquet & Conference Centre.

The video featured a story on Local 793 operator Kyle Knox, a 24-year-old crane apprentice who died in a tragic accident when a drill rig collapsed at a Toronto Transit Commission construction site at York University in 2011.

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Video Feature: Introducing OEBAC

IUOE Local 793 business manager Mike Gallagher and OEBAC CEO Sylvie Charest outline the OEBAC story.

IUOE Local 793 business manager Mike Gallagher and OEBAC CEO Sylvie Charest outline the OEBAC story.

General Membership Meeting: Vote in the best interest of the Union

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 793 held their general membership meeting at the newly expanded OE Banquet Hall in Oakville on September 22. The meeting brought in 239 members, each receiving a limited edition, custom hard hat with the 100th Anniversary logo embedded into the hard hat shell. Retirees, officers and apprentices were […]

The International Union of Operating Engineers Local 793 held their general membership meeting at the newly expanded OE Banquet Hall in Oakville on September 22.

The meeting brought in 239 members, each receiving a limited edition, custom hard hat with the 100th Anniversary logo embedded into the hard hat shell.

Retirees, officers and apprentices were recognized ahead of the day’s presenters.

Also getting acknowledgement was Larry Richard, who resigned as a Local 793 executive board member in January and took on a position as an international representative.

Business manager Mike Gallagher spoke to the membership with a rousing speech that began with “look at us now,” as he spoke about the new banquet hall and the 100th anniversary milestone.

He recognized the honourary lifetime members that were present and spoke of recently deceased member, Wilf Dupuis.
He talked about Brother Wilf’s “nice way of doing things,” and stressed that members need to respect those who had gotten Local 793 to where the Union is today.

Business manager Gallagher then stated that the Local has a commitment to continue to grow. He said that while 15,564 members and growing is amazing, the Local needs to continue making organize a priority.

He spoke about of the pride he felt being business manager of the Local on its 100 year anniversary and shared his experience visiting most of the picnics across the province. He told members how nice it was to see them outside of the context of work with their families enjoying the festivities.

He also told members that it’s important to be the best that we can be; to live a life of honesty and integrity and to not look back and have any regrets. This was capped by a story about the harrowing Baffinland flight that he almost met his fate on.

Attention was turned to the outstanding showing at Labour Day parades across the province, where Local 793 was the lead group in most districts.

“It was a great way to show pride in membership of our great Local and celebrate 100 years strong,” he said.

He pointed out that the Local budgeted $1 million for all the 100th anniversary events in 2019, including 10 picnics, the Morrisburg Rodeo-Picnic, merchandise giveaways, the dinner dance later this year and numerous other events. He was happy to report that the 100th anniversary committee was able to come under budget, spending $975,643.

He was also pleased to say that more than 3,700 members, family and friends attend picnics across the province.

Business manager Gallagher remarked with pride that the OE Banquet Hall was complete and the project came in under budget.

“We budgeted the project at $15 million and to date, the cost incurred sits at $14.2 million.”

He highlighted some of the new features of the hall, including new bathrooms, a new kitchen, and state-of-the-art audio and video just to name a few. He also gave a teaser of the hall lightning and how it can change the mood of the room for any occasion.

The establishment of OEBAC for self-administration of the Union’s benefit and pension plan was the next topic, where business manager Gallagher touched on the reasons why OEBAC became what it is today.

He pointed out that while there will be growing pains, he asked for patience as the Local adjusts to the new administration model.

“We will work to ensure all the kinks get dealt with to ensure the transition is as smooth as possible,” he said.

He then showed an OEBAC video that was created by the communications team at head office. He expressed confidence in being able to administer the Union’s own benefits and fight – and win – cases that previously wouldn’t have been taken on.

He explained that the first transition wave to OEBAC began September 1. The test group consisted of head office and area office staff.

He also discussed preparations for Wave 2 beginning November 1, when the remainder of Union membership will transition.
Business manager Gallagher then spoke on the good health and standing of the pension, ensuring diversified investments were in good shape and reiterated that the ongoing strategy has, and is, working.

He shared that all benefits earned up until January 1, 2019, including pensions in pay, saw an increase of 2.5 per cent. The announcement was well-received, and he said that it felt good to be in a position to do that.

Business manager Gallagher then recognized the team of 12 organizers, naming each one-by-one and thanking them for their dedication.

He touched on labour relations and highlighted that 16 new certificates have been received, representing 1,100 new members to the Union.

Business manager Gallagher concluded by cautioning members against spreading hate against the Local online.
He emphasized showing up to district and general membership meetings in person and putting recommendations forward. He asked that Local 793 not be an online organization and that members live in a world of facts that can be substantiated face-to-face instead of on social media.

“Social media is a space where it can be hard to decipher truth from reality,” he said.

With the Federal election coming up, business manager Gallagher also warned against threats from outside countries to uproot our harmony in Canada.

He spoke about growing up in an NDP family and said he was no stranger to working hard, even in a party that was unlikely to win.

“We had dogs sic’d on us multiple times,” he recalled of canvasing door-to-door.

He spoke on the importance of voting in the best interest of the Union, which is to vote for a pro-union progressive candidate. He stressed that it doesn’t matter what a candidate did in their past and regardless of feeling for a leader, to vote based on history and policy instead of feelings and what you see on social media.

“Imagine an Ontario led by (Doug) Ford and a country led by Andrew Scheer, neither of which are pro-union,” he said. “If Trudeau hadn’t implemented the policies he did, there was no way Baffinland could have happened. We will fight to survive, not fight to grow.”

Following his speech, a motion by Brothers Michael Quinn and Matt Loree was put forth that IUOE Local 793 support, through whatever means possible, progressive, pro-union candidates who have the most legitimate chance of defeating anti-union candidates in the 2019 Federal election.

This shall include allowing the Union the latitude to provide financial support, if necessary.

The motion was met with applause and a resounding unanimous affirmative vote.

President Joe Redshaw took to the podium and shared a story about business manager Gallagher donating money received from the Canadian Conference of the IUOE.

A $5,000 cheque was gifted to business manager Gallagher at the IUOE Canadian Conference held in Charlottetown, PEI, this past August. It was a thank you for his commitment as president of the Canadian Conference.

Business manager Gallagher stepped down from the position in 2018.

The Jack Redshaw Scholarship committee voted that in recognition of the contribution to the fund, the money would be awarded to the top applicant.

That top student would receive, along with a scholarship, an extra $1,000 per year over a five-year period.

Joe was honoured and said it was “very much appreciated.”

Provincial Pipeline and EPSCA business representative Mike Scott gave the Energy Sector Report and spoke about distribution being very busy. He touched on the Kinder Morgan pipeline and how the trades spearheaded the safety campaign.

He also recognized stewards and steward training initiatives.

Acting executive director of OETIO Joe Dowdall presented his Training Report, telling members that attendance is up in both apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship programs.

He spoke on the Federal and Provincial grants and funds Local 793 have received and went through the new equipment that has been purchased, or will be purchased.

He also gave a recount of the current equipment we have at both the Oakville and Morrisburg campuses.

New training initiatives were shared, including new 3D technology that will allow students to view the equipment in virtual reality before ever entering into the machine.

He also talked about the updated website, which is 80 per cent complete and ready to be launched by the new year.

Baffinland training initiatives are in full swing and are being added to monthly.

Dowdall also announced that $2,295 was raised for the 39th Annual Terry Fox Run in Oakville earlier this month, more than doubling the team’s goal of $1,000.

The trustees report was given by Kyle Schutte and treasurer Rick Kerr delivered positive news in his report, saying net revenues are up by 7 per cent. He reported that the total consolidated equity is up, and the Union is in a healthy fiscal space.

Business manager Gallagher closed the general membership meeting with a short story about IUOE general president James T. Callahan and the stand-up character he showed this past April.

United States president Donald Trump visited the IUOE training facility in Crosby, Texas, to sign two executive orders on energy infrastructure development and asked that all Canadian flags be taken down ahead of his visit.

IUOE chief of staff Joe Giacin stood his ground and said, “there’s no presidential visit if there are no Canadian flags.”

General president Callahan backed Giacin’s decision, touching on the pride of Brothers who stand together.

“That’s the kind of International we belong to,” business manager Gallagher proudly said.

Special Executive Board Meeting: It’s been a great year for Local 793

The newly expanded OE Banquet Hall at 2245 Speers Road in Oakville provided an impressive backdrop to the IUOE Local 793 special executive board meeting on September 21. “Wow, isn’t this outstanding,” president Joe Redshaw remarked, as he opened the meeting. “You guys used to be crammed in like sardines and now I can barely […]

The newly expanded OE Banquet Hall at 2245 Speers Road in Oakville provided an impressive backdrop to the IUOE Local 793 special executive board meeting on September 21.

“Wow, isn’t this outstanding,” president Joe Redshaw remarked, as he opened the meeting.

“You guys used to be crammed in like sardines and now I can barely see everyone in the back of the room. A far cry from where we’ve been in the past.”

The more than 140 attendees included area supervisors, business representatives, staff, delegates, officers, honourary lifetime members, and one self-proclaimed ‘retired legend’ in the form of guest delegate Ron Hillis. Brother Hillis’ perfectly timed comment during introductions received a hearty laugh.

Business manager Mike Gallagher began his report by recognizing the honourary lifetime members in attendance; George Bennett, Ken Boyle, Bob Giles, Bob McQueen, Michael Quinn, Claude Roberge, Pat Scott, Mike Chenier and Bruce Knight.

“Every one of them has been important to the Local in terms of building us up to the point where we are now,” business manager Gallagher said.

He also took time to acknowledge recently deceased member and storyteller, Wilf Dupuis.

Brother Wilf was a former chair of Local 793’s Toronto meetings and an active member in many of the Union’s committees. A 65-year member, Brother Wilf was made honourary lifetime member in 2004 and received his 50-year award later that same year. He passed away on May 4, 2019.

“I will miss his points of order. He set us straight when we needed to be set straight, in a nice way,” business manager Gallagher said.

Attention was turned to the 100th anniversary and all the activities held across the province in 2019.

Business manager Gallagher said that getting around to almost all the picnics across the province reminded him of how proud members are to be part of Local 793.

“At the beginning, I thought it would be a burden and so much work to travel to different parts of the province every weekend,” he said. “But, that’s not the experience I had. I loved it!

“What we do is so important,” he continued. “I have always known that but going to these picnics and seeing all the members and the young kids drove it home.

“It’s been great year for us,” he said.

The transition to self-administration under OEBAC was the next topic addressed and he explained that things are going well.

“The move to self-administration will be one of the most important things we’ve ever done,” he said. “It’s important for us to look after our membership.”

He explained that the tools OEBAC provides will be geared toward convenience and the fact that “there will be nobody faster than us” when it comes to claims submission and payment.

“This new benefit administration service is leading edge and the future of benefits administration.”

Business manager Gallagher highlighted a very successful year with the latest round of collective bargaining and pointed out that operating engineers received the highest settlement of all trades across the province.

“We had the highest settlement for our members over and above inflation, with no concessions what-so-ever and I’m proud of that. We didn’t give anything up.”

He added “I believe our skill-set is at the top, not in the middle or the bottom of the pyramid. Without us, nothing happens.”

From there, business manager Gallagher moved on to what he called everyone’s most hated topic – politics. He spoke with passion and conviction, asking members and staff to be educated about the current political climate.

“I believe in facts,” he stated. “We need to make informed choices.”

Gallagher warned of malicious influencers, an abundance of “garbage” and a need to be vigilant when it comes to evaluating political choices.

“Consider the source of information that you are getting. Be careful you are not being manipulated.”

Even with recent troubles, the Liberal Party have been friends to labour and business manager Gallagher encouraged all to be aware of how other parties lean with respect to Unions. He borrowed a line from director of Toronto area Dave Turple and explained, “Even turkeys wouldn’t vote for Thanksgiving.”

Business manager Gallagher remarked with pride that the OE Banquet Hall was complete, and the project came in under budget.

“We budgeted the project at $15 million and to date, the cost incurred is $14.2 million.”

He also pointed to the establishment of the OEBAC offices in the 15,000 square foot building next door to head office.

He closed his report with a glimpse of plans for future expansion, including a student residency, but assured that leadership is always careful to watch the economy ahead of any moves.

OEBAC CEO Sylvie Charest began her presentation showing a video that outlined the OEBAC story. The piece showcased Charest and business manager Gallagher, as they explained the reasons for establishing OEBAC and improvements that the members will see to their claim submission and payment process.

Charest spoke on the first transition wave to OEBAC that began September 1. The test group consisted of head office and area office staffers and she discussed preparations for the “main event” on November 1, when the remainder of Union membership will transition.

Using the large screens in the hall, Charest walked members and staff through the convenient features of the OEBAC Mobile App.

“Now, you will have all of your claims information, and so much more, at your fingertips with these new, cool tools,” she said.

Charest admitted that like all major endeavours, there are bumps in the road.

“We’re optimistic! We’re doing the right things and we’re adjusting to make this work,” she stated. “Is it perfect? No, but we are working hard to adjust as we go.”

She then encouraged members and staff who had already transitioned to OEBAC to relate their experiences to her team so they can continue improving the user experience for all future members.

President Redshaw echoed those comments after he thanked CEO Charest, encouraging the audience to report any hiccups by calling OEBAC.

Provincial Pipeline and EPSCA business representative Mike Scott gave his Energy Sector Report and outlined that work was steady across the province. He gave an update on the numerous projects in both portfolios.

Organizing manager Kyle Schutte discussed the dedication of the organizing team in his report. He began by commending the business reps and stewards that went to Crosby, Texas for the two-day Canadian Political Workshop and the job they did representing Local 793.

He also related the number “573” and explained that it was the amount of days in the last year that organizers have spent up north trying to get cards signed. Time away from their families and he commended them for that.

“That’s a heck of a commitment and a lot of time away from their families, so thank you.”

Schutte then gave an update on a long list of accomplishments that spoke to his team’s dedication.

“The organizing department will continue to set lofty goals. More important than the goal itself is putting the proper plan in place,” he said. “Sometimes that plan can be easy and sometimes you are going to face adversity. The organizers have strong personalities and we will have no problem facing adversity head on.”

Brian Alexander gave a report on the Residential and Civil Construction Alliance of Ontario (RCCAO) and treated the room to laughter, showing a clip from television show “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver” explaining that while infrastructure was not sexy, it is important.

Alexander explained the RCCAO, giving a look at the inner workings of the not-for-profit organization. The RCCAO’s mission is to provide solutions to infrastructure related issues.

Labour Relations manager Melissa Atkins-Mahaney followed, putting the spotlight on the business and area office staff.

“I would like to commend the business reps, all the area offices and the labour relations department who work incredibly hard to try and ensure we don’t have to litigate everything,” Atkins-Mahaney said. “We do an exceptionally good job at getting great results for our members quickly without having to go to the Labour Board.”

Atkins-Mahaney highlighted that 16 new certificates have been received, representing 1,100 new members to the union. As she pointed out, “it’s a remarkable number.”

She also discussed ratifying the Provincial Collective Agreement and its $4.25 increase over three years wage package, increases for travel, room and board, living out, meal, commuting and kilometre allowances.

“Once again, I think we have done an amazing job on behalf of the members and we continue to push forward,” said concluded.

Acting executive director of OETIO Joe Dowdall presented his Training Report and related that both the Oakville and Morrisburg were very busy.

“Last year at this time, January to September 2018, we had 13,872 training days. This year, from January to September 2019, we are up to 14,527. That’s an increase of 655 training days – or 4.75 per cent,” explained Dowdall.

Dowdall also spoke to the 3,880 certificates handed out through E-Learning and focused on the importance of being able to take classes from home for members.

He also had a visual presentation that showed some new training initiatives, including 3D technology, and gave a glimpse at the new OETIO website currently under construction. It is 80 per cent complete and will be online soon.

Dowdall pointed out that OETIO received more than $5.8 million in Federal and Provincial funding in 2018 and broke down where the money was used – to buy equipment for the Morrisburg and Oakville campus’.

“That is a lot of money that members don’t have to pay through dues,” Dowdall pointed out.

He closed with an update on Baffinland training and some new programs available to members, including Light Vehicle FX, Bus Driver Training and Loading “B” Trains.

In closing, Local 793 area delegates gave updates on their areas across Ontario. Those who spoke were Steve Bianco (Hamilton), Rob Bowden (Cambridge), Ian Copps (Sault Ste. Marie), Torie Coqu (Oshawa), Craig Cryderman (Sudbury), Ryan Dagnall (Toronto), Brian Douglas (Belleville), Blair Doyle (St. Catharines), Jim Fleckie (Sarnia), Ted Levesque (Timmins), Todd Madigan (Thunder Bay), Steve Martin (Ottawa), Logan McFarlane (Windsor), Jonathan McMaster (London), Connor Reilly (Toronto) and Mike Reynolds (Barrie).

Exclusive offer to Bell Mobility Discount Plans

IUOE Local 793 is pleased to offer savings to your mobile service with the introduction of the Bell Mobility Discount Plans. The program is designed to offer preferred rate plans to Local 793 members which go beyond standard consumer promotions and special offers. The discount is available to all Local 793 members, retirees and up […]

IUOE Local 793 is pleased to offer savings to your mobile service with the introduction of the Bell Mobility Discount Plans.
The program is designed to offer preferred rate plans to Local 793 members which go beyond standard consumer promotions and special offers.
The discount is available to all Local 793 members, retirees and up to five family members. Members must be initiated and in good standing with the Union to access the plan.
In order to activate or migrate an existing Bell mobile number to the plan for discount, a proof of membership is required. Acceptable proof includes your Union card and Union registration number.
To access exclusive pricing, call the dedicated specialist team at 1-866-244-9108 and activate your plan.
To check out the latest devices, click here and then call the EPP White Glove Centre at 1-866-244-9108 to activate.
Hours of operation: Monday to Friday 9:00AM to 5:00PM EST.

Bell EPP Program FAQ

Existing Bell Customers who want to Migrate to a Bell EPP Rate Plan:
What is an EPP Migration?
• An EPP Migration is when you are currently a Bell Mobility customer and would like to change your account to an EPP Rate Plan
How does a Migration work?
• Member calls into the dedicated Bell EPP Specialist Team at 1-866-244-9108
– Open Monday to Friday: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM EST
– Please note, members can only access EPP rate plans through this number: 1-866-244-9108
– Please do not go to store locations to access plans – they will not be able to process EPP plans
Step 1: Member needs to provide proof of Local 793 membership (1 document):
• Union registration number
Step 2: Once employment is confirmed, the EPP Specialist will fill in the migration form required to transfer the member to an EPP Rate Plan
• Please note, in order to change over to an EPP rate plan you must:
– Pay a $50 migration fee
– Pay off any outstanding device balance and bill balance
• Credit card information is required at this step
Step 3: Once employee has confirmed they want to migrate and they are eligible by going through the first two steps, the request will be sent to the migration team to process by the EPP Specialist
• This could take up 3 business days to process providing they have all the correct information
• If any information is missing, they will contact the member via email
• Once the migration has been processed, they will send the member an email to let them know they are now on the new EPP rate plan
New to Bell – EPP Rate Plan Activation:
How does a new activation work?
• Member calls into the dedicated Bell EPP Specialist Team 1-866-244-9108
– Please note, members can only access EPP rate plans through this number 1-866-244-9108
– Please do not go to store locations to access plans – they will not be able to process EPP plans for employees
Step 1: Member needs to provide proof of Local 793 membership (1 document):
• Union registration number
Step 2: Once member is confirmed
• EPP Specialist will take member through rate plan and device options
• Confirm address, credit card information, etc.
• Once process is complete, a confirmation email will be sent to the member
• The order will be processed
– For members with their own devices and SIM card it will take about 30 minutes unless manual review is required, then the activation will take from 1 hour to 24 hours
– For members activating a new phone with Bell or needing a new sim card, the device will be shipped the within 5 business days.

Local 793 supports 39th annual Terry Fox Run

It was a large turnout for Local 793 members, staff and supporters at the 39th Annual Terry Fox Run in Oakville on Sunday, September 15. Those participating in the event could either walk, run, bicycle, rollerblade or use a wheelchair for the two-kilometre, five-kilometre and 10-kilometre routes around Coronation Park. Members, staff and participants wore […]

It was a large turnout for Local 793 members, staff and supporters at the 39th Annual Terry Fox Run in Oakville on Sunday, September 15.

Those participating in the event could either walk, run, bicycle, rollerblade or use a wheelchair for the two-kilometre, five-kilometre and 10-kilometre routes around Coronation Park.

Members, staff and participants wore specially made 100th Anniversary IUOE Local 793 team t-shirts.

As of 12noon EDT on September 15, 2019, Local 793 raised $2,195, more than doubling the goal of $1,000.

Donations are still being accepted and can be sent to: www.terryfox.ca/iuoeLocal793

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Pipe Line Contractors Student Award Program

pipeline

Since 1974, the Pipe Line Contractors Association of Canada has financially supported students with their education. Awards are offered each year for a student enrolled in a full-time program at a recognized Canadian accredited postsecondary institution. The deadline for completed applications is October 11, 2019. To qualify, an applicant must be a son, daughter or […]

Since 1974, the Pipe Line Contractors Association of Canada has financially supported students with their education. Awards are offered each year for a student enrolled in a full-time program at a recognized Canadian accredited postsecondary institution.

The deadline for completed applications is October 11, 2019.

To qualify, an applicant must be a son, daughter or ward of a person whose principal income is derived from the pipeline construction industry. The parent or guardian of the applicant must be employed by or have a history of employment with a company who is a member or partner of the Pipe Line Contractors Association of Canada.

The applicant must provide proof of full-time enrollment in a program leading to a diploma or degree in any field at a recognized Canadian college or university. Applications received from students enrolled in post-graduate programs may also be considered.

Current application forms need to be completed through the website at www.pipeline.ca.

For more information, please contact the Pipe Line Contractors Association of Canada executive office at 905-847-9383 or email plcac@pipeline.ca.